137: Chris Winfield on Leading with H.O.P.E | Tanya Dalton
August 27, 2019   |   Episode #:

137: Chris Winfield on Leading with H.O.P.E

In This Episode:

The world will be a much happier place if everyone did their part in helping one person every day. Today’s guest, Chris Winfield, strives to do just that. Chris is a serial entrepreneur and co-founder of Super Connector Media, which he successfully built on the concept of helping one person every day, H-O-P-E. We discuss how small changes can have life-altering impacts, why you need to share your gifts with the world, and why he believes in calling himself out when necessary. He also discusses what led him to decide on this concept for his business and what he has noticed that all humans struggle with after working with many entrepreneurs, leaders and celebrities.

Show Transcript:

The Big Idea

A change in perspective can change your life.

Questions I Answer

  • How can I make a bigger impact?
  • What kind of impact can I make?
  • Why do small acts matter?

Actions to Take

  • Think about how you can help one person every day in your life and make the steps toward doing it.
  • Order my book, The Joy of Missing Out.

Key Topics in the Show

  • Two monumental changes that altered Chris’ life

  • Why Chris believes in calling himself out

  • How feeling like his own daughter couldn’t count on him motivated him to make a change

  • Why Chris decided to help one person every day and why that matters

  • How sharing your passion can create big impact for others

Resources and Links

Show Transcript

Welcome to season 11 of Productivity Paradox with Tanya Dalton, a podcast 

focused on finding true fulfillment and happiness through the power of productivity. Join Tanya this season as she explores the theme of small changes for big impact. To get her free checklist, Five Minutes to Peak Productivity, simply g

to TanyaDalton.com/podcast. 

Now here’s your host, Tanya Dalton. 

Tanya: 

Hello, hello everyone. Welcome to Productivity Paradox. I’m your host, 

Tanya Dalton, and this is episode 137, How to Lead with Hope, H-O-P-E. And I have a very special guest on today’s show. I’m really excited to introduce you to him because Chris Winfield is someone who has dramatically affected my own life and has really helped me create the impact I truly wanted to make. Chris is the co-founder and CEO of Super Connector Media based in New York City. And he has successfully built SCM on the concept of helping one person every day. H-O-P-E. Which has earned him the title of The Super Connector by many in the media and entrepreneurial world. 

As a serial entrepreneur, Chris created Unfair Advantage Live, the world’s premier publicity event connecting entrepreneurs who want to make an impact to the media. Prior to starting Super Connector Media, 

Chris worked with executives from many of the world’s best-known companies including Disney, Virgin, Macy’s, Viacom, Conde Nast, Intuit, NBC and many others. 

To put it simply, Chris gives entrepreneurs an unfair advantage when it comes to getting more publicity, making connections, and growing their companies, Chris currently lives in New York City with his daughter, Vivian, his life and business partner, Jen Gotlieb, and their three dogs. So, without further ado, let me introduce you to Chris. 

Chris, I am ecstatic to have you on the show. 

Chris: 

Oh my God, we were saying that we could just talk forever. We had i think a full podcast interview before this even started, so 

Tanya: 

I think we did, basically. Chris and I’ve been chatting, preparing for the interview, and I was like, we could have just recorded this because honestly, Chris and I could chat all day. As I mentioned in his introduction, Chris has been so influential in my own life, and he’s been such an inspiration to me. Chris has completely shifted my perspective on how we can impact people, 

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SO, Chris, I know that your life is now in a very different place than it was a few years ago, and I think we often think of this moment of shift as this huge moment where something really monumental happens. But for you it took a piece of pizza to realize you needed to change, right? 

Chris: 

Yeah. I mean, it’s so interesting, as you know, so one of the quotes that we live by is, “You can’t connect the dots looking forward, you can only connect them looking backwards,” the Steve Jobs quote from the 2009 commencement speech at Stanford. And why I love that so much is that so often you don’t even realize how much something is going to change your life. And for me, so often with those moments, they …I didn’t realize it until much later. And I think it’s such an important thing for people to remember, because that means that there could be something, a change that you could make today, and that could be a huge change, like changing a career or relation, or it could just be a change of perspective, a change of attitude. And that change could wind up affecting and all altering your entire life. 

And that’s such a cool thing to think about, if you really … because I think that so often, we think that it’s got to be these huge, giant things, and like the Jerry McGuire moment or something. 

Tanya: 

Right. 

Chris: 

Quitting. But you know, a lot of times … and you might not even realize it. So, for me, it was … I look at, there’s really two different times in my life that were the monumental ones. And neither … I didn’t realize either one of them until much later. So, the first one is in 2011 when I got sober. And I went to rehab, I went and did all this stuff, and I didn’t realize how much that was going to completely change my life. But that’s what opened me, it started opening me up to everything and started me changing, that’s what helped me find gratitude, helped me find God, everything that is so important to me. 

Now again, like when I woke up that day on January 3rd, 2011, I wrote 

down “Today’s the worst day of my life.” Now I look back on that day as the best day of my life. And that’s so important to remember, because it doesn’t … like perspective is an amazing gift because 

Tanya; 

Yes. 

Chris: 

It took me six months to realize that that was the best day of my life. Like it really, legit six months. 

And then the other one, which you just mentioned, was March of 2013, so about two years later. So, I had been sober, I’d been changing my life, but I had also started a company nine months before that in 2010. And this company had grown to about 100 people, and it looked great on the 

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outside and it was a complete mess on the inside, and I hated what I was doing, I was not passionate about it. It was a marketing agency. I did not attract the right people in because at that time when I started, I was not the right person to be attracting anything. 

And I was comfortable being uncomfortable. And I think that there’s … important thing is there’s two different ways, two different types of uncomfortability. There’s a good type where you’re outside of your comfort zone, and you’re pushing yourself, and you’re becoming better, and you’re doing something that you know is helping you. And then there’s the other where you’re uncomfortable, but you’re stuck. Like you don’t want to change, so you’re going through your routine. 

So, for me, my ego was so attached to my company, and I couldn’t imagine myself without that even though I hated it, I hated going into work every day and 

Tanya: 

Yes. 

Chris: 

It was my own, I was the co-founder of this company. And that company completely just like spectacularly imploded and all … again, like all the worst possible things that I could imagine, like pretty much all happened, business wise. And I lost pretty much all my money, and I had no clue like what I was going to do, and I was so consumed with that. And I was sitting in … or not sitting, I was standing in my kitchen and it was like a Saturday evening, afternoon, like late afternoon, early evening. And my daughter, who at the time was three, almost four, so her name is Vivian and she is and was the most important person in my life, but I did not … like, my actions weren’t really lining up with that. So, I was like a workaholic, consumed with that and just really consumed with, I think myself. Even though I was trying to change, I just couldn’t get out of 

that. 

And she walks in and I’m on a phone call and it was like … I always joke, it was the most important phone call in the world, which 

Tanya: 

Right? 

Chris: 

If you said, “All right Chris, I’m going to give you 10 million dollars, tell me who you were talking to and what you’re talking about,” I would not be able to collect that 10 million dollars. 

Tanya: 

Right? So important at the time. And yet was it really important? 

Chris: 

Isn’t that such a great reminder too, because 

Tanya: 

Yeah. 

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Chris: 

There’s things that from last week that felt so unbelievably important to me that now I look and I’m like, ha ha, I laugh. Or you know, from this morning. So, I love that reminder for myself. And by the way, I’m a big proponent of calling myself out on stuff because it helps me to remember about where I was, and also that if I am ever falling back into the same patterns and I think … because I don’t have anything, I don’t have it figured out, you know? 

Tanya: 

Yeah. Nobody has it all figured out. Let’s be honest, right? 

Chris: 

We‘ve talked about this and I love that you always feel the same, and there’s no gurus or anything like that. 

So, Saturday afternoon, evening, my daughter, I’m on this call, my daughter walks into the kitchen and sees me and she says, “Daddy, I’m hungry.” And I gave her … I raised my one finger, index finger, and just said, “One minute,” and she looked at me and she was like (inaudible 00:08:41] because she knew that one minute equaled like five or 20 

Tanya: 

Yeah, more like 30 minutes, right? 

Chris: 

Yeah, exactly. She didn’t have that confidence in that. And so, she walks over, opens up the refrigerator and looks in there and grabs a piece of pizza, looks back at me like, “Do you want me to do this?” And I am kind of watching her, she goes, gets a chair, pushes it up to the counter and takes out a plate, pushes the chair over to … puts the pizza on the plate, pushes the chair over to the microwave, starts hitting . puts the pizza and the plate in the microwave, starts hitting a bunch of buttons, and cooking her own dinner. And 

Tanya: 

At three years old. 

Chris: 

At three years old. And now … I’m not saying this because now she’s like this amazing chef or something, and there’s some like great parenting 

Tanya: 

That would be a great story, but no. 

Chris: 

Yeah, no. It was because at that moment for whatever reason, right then, Thad this feeling of oh my God, I am so disconnected from people, and … that my own daughter, who is the most important thing to me, doesn’t even feel like she can count on me or that we’re connected. And I remember just hanging up the phone in the middle of the conversation. I think the other person was like mid-sentence. I just hit end, and I just had this feeling of like, wow, I can’t do this. Like I can’t be this person, who’s so like consumed with himself. And for a long time, I had just been living behind my computer, and my phone, and just not … I was just very disconnected. 

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So, I sat down, and I just realized, all right, I need to change things. So, 1 started getting really focused on like becoming a much better person, daily routines and habits, and things like that. But then the big thing that I realized was like, I’m disconnected from people. So, what I started doing, I just had this idea, let me just start meeting with somebody each day and just reconnecting. And be open, honest, and vulnerable with them, so be okay with just saying whatever. Because up until that point, I’d never wanted you to know anything other than just the good stuff, and 

Tanya: 

Right. 

Chris: 

Or what i 

Tanya: 

We all like to have that facade, that very Pinterest worthy or Instagram worthy facade that looks like we have it all together. 

Chris: 

Exactly. Exactly. And that’s when … I never wanted to talk about being afraid, or feeling like a fraud or imposter syndrome, or any of these things that were a reality for me and a reality for every person that I’ve pretty much ever met 

Tanya: 

Yes. 

Chris: 

Since then. 

Tanya: 

Absolutely. Absolutely. 

Chris: 

So, I started meeting somebody each day. And then I also, the last part of this experiment was let me, instead of figuring out what they can do to help me and going into it that way, let me try to see what I can do to help them. And let me go into each meeting with that mindset. So, 1. started … I thought of this question and the question was, “What do you need help with right now?” So, whether I would ask that from somebody or just try to figure it out during the meetings, but that’s all that I started doing. And I’m good about carrying out, when I commit to something, I’m really good about being able to do that. So, 1 committed to that, and it was just like an experiment. It was just something to get me out and meeting people, and because I didn’t know what I was ever going to do again for work or anything like that. All I knew is what I didn’t want, and what I didn’t want was what 

Tanya: 

Right 

Chris: 

I already had. 

Tanya 

That’s a good place to start though, right? 

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Chris: 

Yeah 

Tanya: 

Sometimes we have to start with what we don’t want if we don’t know what we do want, because most of us don’t know what we want. 

Chris: 

It’s such a good point Tanya. It’s such a great place to start. And … because if you have no idea, like if you sit down and you’re like trying to 

figure out, and you have no idea where to even start, like just think about all the things you don’t want. Or yeah, just do the … like write down the opposite. So, if it was being all consumed with myself, what would be the opposite of that? And 

Tanya: 

Yes. 

Chris: 

So, I started doing this. And the crazy thing is that here we are, six years and maybe five months later or something like that, and I’ve done this every single day since then. Now, on some days it’s just been calls, or some days it’s just been Zoom meetings or … but even if it’s like a five or 10-minute call or something, but I’ve met and connected with at least one person since that time. 

Now, it did not start off as something that I was like looking to do 

Tanya 

Right. 

Chris: 

That. It was really to get outside of myself. 

Tanya: 

You call this hope, right? H-O-P-E. 

Chris: 

H-O-P-E, help one person every day. 

Tanya: 

Help one person every day. That’s an … I think it’s such an amazing, amazing thing. So sorry, go ahead. 

Chris: 

Yeah. So, I started … I just met with all these different people and from all walks of life, so … and they would range from billionaires and celebrities, that guy that owns the New York Times, the guy who owns Loews Hotels, like celebrities that I grew up watching, to people that have lost everything and had nothing. It really ranged, like I just wanted to connect with people, 

Tanya: 

Yeah, so it wasn’t about what they were, or how they could help you, it was really just you helping one person every day

Chris: 

Exactly. 

Tanya: 

Right. Regardless of who they are or what their path is, you helping one person 

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Chris: 

Exactly. And the crazy thing is, so what I started to realize was, because I would be very open about where I was at, and what had happened with me, and all these different things. And what I started to realize was that 

everyone has the same issues. Like it was amazing to me. Especially where it really started to amaze me would be with people, like celebrity, like people that I grew up like loving their movies, and then they would talk to me about how they have imposter syndrome, or whatever. 

I remember this one guy who became a friend, he was at one point the highest paid actor on TV, on cable TV, and top show and his show just was crushing. And I remember him telling me he was always waiting for 

them to find out that he didn’t know what he was doing. Now this, he was being paid hundreds of thousands of dollars per episode, he had all this money coming in. It was literally … like critically acclaimed show, all this. And he was waiting for them to find out that he had no clue what he was doing. 

And I remember him telling me this story where he had bought a new house, brand new house in LA, and he just always, he still, like it didn’t fill the hole. And then he bought like this … He was telling me he bought this new dining room set, and he got up in the middle of the night and he was walking like to the bathroom or something, he passed by there and he’s like … it was as if like the dining room set was mocking me, like being like, who the F do you think you are? You know? And he just realized it had to come from within at that point. 

And like stories like that were just over and over. And the difference that I started to realize, though, was that everyone has the same issues. Everyone has struggles with fear and struggles with insecurity and all these things. The people that were successful and happy had just found a way to push through that, and to not let that stop them. 

Tanya: 

Yes. 

Chris: 

And that was one of the … that was it. Nothing else, like that was the big thing. So, yeah, it’s amazing that that one little piece of pizza led to this and which has led to an amazing life, and an amazing company, and all these different things, 

Tanya; 

Yes, absolutely. And I want to dive into this a little bit more. First, I want to give a quick break for today’s sponsor, but I want to chat more about this idea of how we can help one person out, and what you said to me about how I was selfish. So, let’s go ahead and take a quick break 

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SO, Chris, you started off with this idea of HOPE, helping one person every day. So just little small things making a difference. And I love what you were talking about right before the break, where you were talking about how we all struggle with this imposter syndrome or thinking that we’re not good enough. Or someone’s going to figure it all out, like this person doesn’t know what they’re talking about. 

And you said something really powerful to me. You told me that I was selfish. 

Chris: 

Yep. 

Tanya 

Which I’ll be honest, totally felt like a sucker punch. Cause here I am doing a lot of work to try to help people and you’re like, “Well you’re being selfish.”. 

Chris: 

Yep. 

Tanya; 

But here’s the truth. YOU were right. And it changed everything for me. It was so powerful, it changed my perspective completely. So, can you tell my listeners why you said I was selfish? 

Chris: 

Yeah, so when we first met, so Tanya came to our event, Unfair Advantage Live, and we wound up doing a hot seat together. And I’d heard … we review everyone, and it’s all application only, so I knew about you coming into it. And I’d looked at your work and listened to some stuff and I was like, “Wow, this woman’s amazing.” And but then when we were talking, it was a much different version of Tanya than I hear now. And even right before, even right before, here’s a perfect, here’s a perfect snapshot of your growth. Like I was talking to Tanya about how much we love her in our team and all this, and like that I wouldn’t schedule anything for today because my daughter is coming in and I had scheduled this early in the morning, blah, blah, blah. And she was like, “| accept that compliment. I received that.”. 

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Tanya: 

I’m receiving it. 

Chris: 

“I received that.” And I was like, oh my God, this is amazing. Because I feel like a year ago you would have been like, “Oh no, it’s email, blah blah, blah,” 

Tanya: 

Yeah 

Chris: 

Apologize for that or whatever. And you’re like, [inaudible 00:19:43]. So that’s what I’m talking about. So, I saw this message, and this messenger, meaning you, and I realized that as you were talking that you were holding back in such a big way. And that there were so many more people that you could help if you got out of your own head in terms of like 

Tanya: 

Yes. 

Chris: 

Oh, I don’t want to be promotional, or I don’t want it to come across … where my belief, and my passion, and why I get up excited every single day, and why I absolutely love working with people like you is when somebody is good, when somebody has a message, when somebody is helping people, I do not want them ever to hold back from sharing that message as far and as wide as possible. Like that is my belief in my core, 

that you have to do that. There’s no if, ands, or buts around that. 

Tanya 

Yes. 

Chris: 

Because you don’t know what … because I think about for myself, how many times I heard a message from somebody that wound saving my 

life or changing my life. Now, if that person had said, “Oh, I’m not … don’t feel like writing this book, or I don’t feel like going on and doing this or doing that,” 

Tanya 

Or I’m not good enough, right? 

Chris: 

I’m not good enough. 

Tanya: 

Who’s going to listen to me? 

Chris: 

Or why me? There’s people that are so much more qualified or whatever, then that would … that would affect my life, and the same thing for me. Like I call myself out on this as well. Like if I’m like, “Oh, I don’t feel like doing …” inaudible 00:21:15], you’re going to do it and you’re going to go all in. And you know, so that’s when I talk about being selfish. Like, because Tanya, I think you would be the last person in the world to ever think of yourself as selfish, but when you’re not 

Tanya: 

I try not to be, so 

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Chris: 

Yeah, because it’s not you, but when you’re not sharing that, it is. 

Tanya: 

It’s true. When you’re not sharing your own personal greatness, your message, whatever you feel passionate about, you’re keeping that from other people. And I think that’s really, that was the slap in the face ! really needed. Thanks for that, Chris. 

Chris: 

My pleasure. 

Tanya: 

You were happy to do it. Honestly, it just … When you start to think of it that way, as holding these gifts back is not helping other people and you have the ability to help other people, it is selfish not to reach out, and not to try to make that impact. And I think that we think we have to go big to make an impact, but a lot of times it’s just the small acts. It’s not … you don’t have to have a podcast, you don’t have to do anything big. It’s like Chris’s philosophy of help one person every day, whether that’s a person in line at Starbucks or it’s the dry cleaner you’re picking up your clothes from, or whether it’s somebody that you look up to and you want to reach out to and try to connect with them. Those interactions, those really matter and make a difference. 

Do you agree with that Chris? Like especially with the relationships that you’ve built, it’s not always the big ones, right? 

Chris: 

100%, and it’s also, so I think one of the big problems that people run into is thinking, “How could I help this person?” Like this person has everything, so if I’m meeting with the guy who owned the New York Times, I get that point. Like yeah, there’s nothing that I, on paper, had to offer him. But the thing is to think about, sometimes being enthusiastic, being a great listener, being open with your own struggles, taking people’s advice, following up, like those things are priceless gifts. 

Tanya 

Yes. 

Chris: 

And everyone can do that. So sometimes that can just mean like sitting next to somebody on an airplane and listening, or talking, or sharing. Like I’ve had so many different people say to me in my life, “I’d never told anyone this,” and I don’t take that lightly. Meaning that people opened up to me about … have opened up to me about their greatest like secrets or failures, their … like anything that you can imagine I’ve heard. And many times, I was the first person to hear, which is wild. Like, it’s just because … but by creating that safe space for people, and being just who you are, and being open with that, it’s unbelievable what a gift that it is, especially now. And especially, we live in this social media highlight reel world. I know your book is like, touches on this so much and it’s so important with The Joy of Missing Out. 

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But that’s … that’s affecting people. And you … especially like if you’re in like the entrepreneurial worlds or like any … I guess any career, there’s so much perceived competition, and having to be perfect and all this. And I just don’t buy into it. So, I lead with my imperfections. Like you remember at our event, like I get up there and I tell the stories, and I talk about losing all my money and I’m like, “Aren’t you guys glad you came to this?” To learn from me. But I’m never going to … I’m never going to try to be something that I’m not. 

Tanya 

No. 

Chris: 

Because I lived that way for a long time, and while it worked in quotes, you know, for quite a while and I got lots of stuff, I was miserable. 

Tanya: 

Right. 

Chris: 

And I wasn’t making anyone’s life around me better and I just won’t do that. 

Tanya 

Yeah, when we live a real authentic life on a daily basis and we genuinely listen to others, and we support and encourage other people, I think people lose sight of that is a … that’s such an incredible way to make an impact. Even like I know for me, with talking to people about pre ordering the book, asking for support, that’s really hard. So, when people reach out and they’ll email, or they’ll DM me and they‘re like, “I pre ordered the book!” I don’t think people know how much that makes my day. 

Chris: 

Oh my God. 

Tanya: 

I don’t think people have any idea how much that encourages me. And it’s just such a small thing, right? It’s that love and support that we get from people, whether we know them, or we don’t know them. Those little interactions, they make a much bigger ripple in that pond than you’ll ever realize. 

Chris: 

Agreed. So, anyone who’s listening right now, do yourself a favor, buy Tanya’s book, and then leave a review when it’s time, and then send her a DM and let her know and she’ll be so happy and send you so much love backwards. 

Tanya: 

Oh, I do love you, Chris. You’re awesome. It’s true though. It’s hard to ask for support, and it is really daunting, but those little things make a huge difference in everyone’s life. Not just mine, but in yours. I mean, you and I are constantly sending DMs to each other when we’re doing 

Chris: 

Yep. 

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Tanya: 

Things that we’re pleased and proud of for each other. Those little lifts, I’ll get a little note from Chris, he’s like, “Oh, you did an amazing job today on this.” And it really makes a difference. That impact then bleeds into when I go home, being in a better mood for my kids, which bleeds into how I do my podcast that night, or how I do… all those things happen. It’s all building one thing after another. The impact we can all make is so much greater than we can possibly see. It’s just a matter of making those small steps. 

Chris: 

Without a doubt. And so, two quick things around that. So, one, there’s one of my favorite quotes comes from Jim Roan and it’s, “You’re the average of the five people you spend the most time with.” And the thing that I love about that is not just like to keep that in mind around the people that you’re spending the most time, because that’s who’s going to rub off on you the most, but that’s a really important thing to remember in terms of how you’re showing up in the world. 

Tanya: 

Yes. 

Chris: 

Because when you’re helping other people, like you are then improving their five people’s lives, and then they’re improving their five, and it’s just these success and happiness ripples that get sent out. So, I always keep that in mind with just how I show up in the world. 

The other around asking for help. So, I have a great reframe for this as well. And my question for you, Tanya, and everyone who’s listening is how do you feel when you help somebody else and especially somebody that you care about? 

Tanya: 

Yeah, I mean there’s nothing better than being able to feel like you’ve helped somebody, right? That you’ve lifted them up when they needed lifting or supporting them. 

Chris: 

Yeah. 

Tanya: 

There’s no better feeling. 

Chris: 

Yeah. So why would you deprive other people of being that gift for you? 

Tanya: 

Mm-hmm. Yeah, I really truly believe that when you allow others to lift you up, that is a gift you are giving. 

Chris: 

Yeah. 

Tanya: 

You are giving them a gift. 

Chris: 

Exactly. 

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Tanya: 

I think that’s true. I talk about this a lot with our kids. We feel like we have to do it all as the parent. Allowing your children to lift you up, that makes them really feel like they’re part of the family and that they are … they’re important to you because they are there helping you. 

Chris: 

Exactly. 

Tanya: 

I think that’s so true. And that’s what I love about Chris. He’s so good at reframing and changing perspective on a lot of these things. Chris, I really would love for my listeners to connect with you, so tell me the best place for them to connect with you. 

Chris: 

So, they can find me at Chris Winfield, W-1-N-F-I-E-L-D. SO, C-H-R-I-S, and then W-I-N-F-I-E-LD dot com. And Chris Winfield on Instagram and pretty much everywhere else. 

Tanya: 

Yeah. 

Chris: 

And the other, we host an amazing event, which is where we first met Tanya called Unfair Advantage Live. 

Tanya: 

Yeah, it’s a fabulous event. As I’ve said numerous times in the introduction and here, Chris really has been so impactful and so inspirational in my own life, and he really has completely shifted my perspective in such a positive way. I’m incredibly grateful for you. I’m 

grateful for you coming on the show and sharing a lot of your wisdom and your reframing with my listeners, but I’m truly just grateful for having you in my life. I feel like, honestly, God puts people in our path at certain times and I feel He placed you in mine at the time I needed you, so thank you so much, Chris. 

Chris: 

I received that. 

Tanya: 

I love it. 

Chris: 

And I appreciate it and yeah, it is, I tell … luckily get to tell you often, I am unbelievably grateful. Our team is like … We have … for everyone we get to work with Tanya on the publicity side, and we ... Whenever there’s a win, Maggie, who’s her direct conduct, will always use the hashtag Team Tanya, and that’s … We are Team Tanya for life. 

Tanya: 

Well, I really do appreciate it and I also receive that. 

Chris: 

Amazing 

Tanya 

Oh, I absolutely love this interview and I’m so pleased that you guys were able to hear a lot about Chris’s philosophy, especially that help one person every day. Just that small change, just that one tiny step, really 

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can make a huge impact in the lives of others and in your own life as well. 

So, I want to continue this idea of helping other people out, working together next week in our episode on creating a support system. Now, speaking of support systems, you guys are my support system here, so 1 want to make sure and encourage you to head over to 

JoyofMissingout.com to go ahead and pre-order The Joy of Missing Out. That is a fabulous way to support me with my goal of hopefully, hopefully making the New York Times bestseller list. 

I really do want to get this book into the hands of as many women as ! possibly can. I want this to be more than a book, I want it to be a movement and you can help make that happen. And pre-ordering the book not only helps me, but it also helps you, because I’ve got some amazing pre-order bonuses including access to my $247.00 course, Discover Your North Star. I know you’ll absolutely love it, and it goes so well with the book. I’m so excited about giving that away as part of the pre-order bonuses, so definitely be sure to check that out. Simply head to JoyofMissingOut.com for information on where to order the book, and then fill out the form to grab those pre-order bonuses. All right, until next time, have a beautiful and productive week. 

Thanks for listening to Productivity Paradox. Now, we’d love to have you join the conversation. To Join Tanya’s free group, simply go to Tanyadalton.com/group. 

©Productivity Paradox 

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