133: Boss Up! with Lindsay Teague Moreno | Tanya Dalton
July 30, 2019   |   Episode #:

133: Boss Up! with Lindsay Teague Moreno

In This Episode:

Lindsay’s on the show to share how she’s built several million-dollar producing companies and empowered thousands of women to say YES to building the business of their dreams. She shares how she got started as an entrepreneur and how she discovered her passion for teaching women about social media, branding, sales and storytelling. We discuss what it’s like working with our husbands in our businesses, teaching children the value of a dollar and working for what they deserve, and why you should find comfort in disrupting the world.

Show Transcript:

The Big Idea

Being unique allows you to stand out

Questions I Answer

  • How canI figure out what I’m passionate about?
  • What can I do if I want to be unique?
  • How much should I charge for my services?
  • What’s a money mindset?

Key Topics in the Show

  • Lindsay walks us through discovering her passion

  • Finding comfort in disrupting the status quo and ruffling a few feathers

  • Doubling down on what makes you and your business different

  • How Lindsay learned to start charging her worth

  • Changing your mindset around money

Resources and Links

Show Transcript

Welcome to Season 11 of Productivity Paradox with Tanya Dalton, a podcast 

focused on finding true fulfillment and happiness through the power of productivity. Join Tanya this season as she explores the theme of small changes for big impact. To get her free checklist, Five Minutes to Peak Productivity, simply g

to inkWELLpress.com/podcast. 

Now here’s your host, Tanya Dalton. 

Tanya: 

Hello, hello everyone. Welcome to Productivity Paradox. I’m your host, Tanya Dalton. And this is episode 133. Today, we are going to continue our theme that we’re exploring all season long of small changes for big impact. And have I got a guest for you. I am so excited to introduce you to Lindsay Teague Moreno. Lindsay is the author of the Amazon bestseller, Getting Noticed, and the upcoming book Boss Up! Lindsay has empowered thousands of women over the years by empowering 

them to say yes to building the business of their dreams. 

As a momtrepreneur with more than 13 years of experience, she’s grown several million dollar producing businesses. And all of this was done while raising her three little girls with her husband, Michael. Lindsay is passionate about blowing the doors off the stigma that motherhood and entrepreneurship cannot coexist. Through teaching business basics such as social media, branding, sales and storytelling, Lindsay has been able to impact thousands of women and help them live the life most people only ever dream about. So, let’s get started. 

Tanya: 

Lindsay, I am absolutely thrilled to have you today on the show. 

Lindsay: 

Yay. I’m so excited to be here. Thank you. I’m so excited. 

Tanya: 

Absolutely. So, if you don’t mind, why don’t you give my listeners a little bit about your background? 

Lindsay

I am a multi-passionate entrepreneur is what I like to say. I am a speaker, writer, entrepreneur, business owner, a podcaster, retail shop owner. I like to get into an industry, and for me, the industry that I am just in love with and passionate about pouring my life into is female entrepreneurship. So, I get into this business and then I start looking around for needs. What need can I fill? And my businesses have all grown out of this. Nobody is doing that right now. I can do that for you, kind of thing. 

And for me that has worked amazingly. All of my businesses are built out of a need. My very first business was back when I was a little kid, 1 

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owned a lemonade stand and I’m not talking about like, you’re just like neighborhood lemonade stand. I was like making a bunch of money as a 

little kid in a lemonade stand. My parents had bought me this video game on like the Apple lle old clunky computer, and I said all right. 

Tanya: 

Oh, yeah, I’m familiar. 

Lindsay: 

It was called Lemonade Stand. And in this thing, it taught you how to like 

Tanya 

Tremember that. 

Lindsay: 

Do you remember it? 

Tanya: 

Oh, I do. And I love it. 

Lindsay: 

Oh my gosh. 

Tanya: 

I mean the graphics today would never hang up. I mentioned to my kid several times. It was like green letters on a black screen. 

Lindsay: 

So, I played Lemonade Stand like crazy and it taught me to learn about profits and loss and margins, and how to understand when people were going to buy and when they weren’t. And I took that information and built a lemonade stand that made a bunch of money. I’d take my little wagon out with my lemonade that my mom made me pay back for and I went out to a golf course, and I stood out there, and that was my very first business where I was like, okay, if I work myself for myself, I can make a bunch of money

So, from there I just always knew I was going to be an entrepreneur one day. I was going to own my own business. I was going to own some kind of business that everybody was going to need. Like what product am! going to create that everybody needs? And growing up I started to realize, “Oh, hey. You’re just not going to go compete with like craft.” So, let’s scale this back a little bit. And right out of college I went to work for my mom. She was a real estate agent, so she owned her own business, and she taught me a ton about entrepreneurship. And from there I kind of broke out and started doing freelance scrap booking, which is the coolest thing that anyone could do, 

But I started creating like scrapbook pages and then I’d worked for the magazines. And I put those in the magazines. I’d get paid for them. And I 

get paid by the people that created the product for it. And that was great untill needed like really steady money as I got older, right? 

Tanya: 

Right. 

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Lindsay

And that just wasn’t steady. So, I went to work for a fortune 500 company, and I grew at that company and I started becoming a manager in that company. So, my first foray into managing people was there. And I just realized I can’t work for somebody else, I have to work for myself. And so, I started 

Tanya: 

Yes, I understand that. 

Lindsay: 

I started doing photography on the side. And at that time, we had agreed… I had met my husband at that time, I had kids. I have three kids, twins, and then another daughter that’s two years younger than them. And we were moving all the time, every single year of the first eight years of my marriage with Michael, we moved. And so, I would start my photography business up in every different place that we moved. 

And the great thing about that was that I got to learn how to network with people, how to build a business out of nothing over and over and over again. The bad part was that I never got to keep the clients that had because I moved to a different city. And so eventually I was just kind of doing my thing on the side. Michael was working full time and just was super unhappy as a stay at home mom. And I was super ashamed to say it out loud. So, I didn’t. I kept it in for a really long time, and I just was unhappy doing what I was doing. And I felt I was alone, and I felt it was wrong of me to feel being a stay-at-home mom wasn’t my calling because that was what I had agreed to do, right? 

Tanya: 

Right. Yeah, I think that’s really common that we 

Lindsay: 

So common 

Tanya: 

We think we’re supposed to be fulfilled by motherhood, but not everything is. I talked about this in my own book where I’m like I really think there’s more to me than just being a mom. But then you feel so guilty about it like we’re made to be moms and so therefore we should somehow be like that fulfills us completely. And it doesn’t always. 

Lindsay: 

Right. And what’s wrong with us that it doesn’t? Why am I not this girl over here? I know that’s just comparison and judgment and it’s all on us. We‘re doing that to ourselves. And so, I finally just had the guts to say, “I don’t love this. I need something else.” And at that time an essential oils sales business fell into my lap completely accidentally. And I don’t consider myself an MLM person, but it was an MLM. And when I first thought of it, I was really upset about it because I didn’t want to get into that business. It’s not something that I want to do. I don’t want to take advantage of my friends and do all this stuff that every typical MLM person does. But it was something that I noticed I couldn’t run awa

from. And so, for me, that was a god moment in my life where it was 

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something that I tried not to do for long enough that kept chasing me down the road. 

And I just thought, okay, well, I’m building a paycheck here totally by accident, just by talking about what I like and so I was like if I can do this and make 700 bucks a month not trying, what could I do if I did try, right? 

Tanya: 

Right, yeah. 

Lindsay: 

And I’ve watched all these people’s struggle to sell this product that they loved, that they clearly were passionate about. And I just thought there’s just such a better way to do this than the way that everyone is doing it. So, I kind of studied the way that MLMS were run and then I decided, all right, I’m going to do this the opposite way. Whatever, everyone else is doing it. I’m going to do the opposite thing here. And I’m going to teach women how to run an actual business rather than run an MLM business. 

And first of all, that business took off. We’re six years in and that business will bring in $350 million this year and there are 550,000 members. So the way that we did it worked, but what was the real blessing in all of that outside of the freedom and the money that I got, and freedom I can use to do whatever I want to now is that I found out 1 was more passionate about teaching women business than lever was 

about selling a product. And that really put me on my path, and it allowed me to figure out what do these women need to be able to make this business work for them to make any business work for them? How can I teach them to have the hard conversations with their spouse? How can I teach them about profits and loss? How can I teach them how much they need to put back into their business? 

And I started building businesses to do exactly that, and that has created a bunch of spin off businesses and has created a situation where now I have been able to not work to sell a product anymore, but instead work in my passion, which is encouraging and firing women up for their purpose now rather than waiting until their kids are gone, and out of 

their house to do it and then having to find themselves again. 

Tanya; 

Absolutely. I love it because we are so aligned in what we talk about. We talk in different ways

Obviously, you’ve read my book, l’ve read your book. We’re very much aligned in what we talk about. And I love what you said there. You touched on a couple of things. First of all, you’re answering a need. And I think when we’re looking to make an impact, that’s really what we want to do. We want to solve other people’s problems. We want to help them out. But then you don’t do it everybody else does it. You don’t copy, you 

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don’t look at what, “Oh, this person over here is doing it this way. So, I’m going to do it the same way.” You think outside the box, and you approach it in a different way, and you make it unique to you, right? 

Lindsay: 

Yes, yes, yes, yes, yes. I’m so in agreement with you. I actually read this great quote today. Let me see if I can find it for you. It was an Alice Hoffman quote and she said, “When are you going to realize that being normal isn’t necessarily a virtue? It’s rather a denoted, a lack of courage.” And I felt like, yes. 

Tanya: 

I love that. 

Lindsay: 

We’re so busy trying to fit in so that we don’t make anybody mad. We’re not going to tick anybody off. They’re not going to hate us, and we’re disadvantaged to our own selves when we do that instead of just being who we are, liking what we like, saying what we want, and going for the thing that’s going to fulfill us now, and realizing that is going to make us a better friend, spouse, mother, you name it, by being fulfilled personally because we can’t give anything to anyone if we’re not getting, if we’re not fulfilled inside. 

Tanya: 

Absolutely. I completely agree. And I think that’s the thing that sometimes holds women back is when you put your neck out there, when you stick your head out and you do go for something that you’re passionate about, you’re going to get some naysayers. You’re going to have some people, even people who love you, who are like, “No, no, no, no. Come back to the group. Don’t leave the house. Don’t do to the wilderness.” This is a thing, Sometimes it’s done out of love. Sometimes it’s done because other people are not happy with their own situation. But I find 

Lindsay

It’s most of the time. Come on. It’s most of the time. 

Tanya: 

Yeah. You’re absolutely right. I think people would be shocked at the amount of hate mail that I get. When you think about like… And I know you touched on this too, in the book that I’m doing things to really help women. That’s my goal is to really help women live their best lives. How does this upset you? But when you’re disrupting, when you’re pushing people outside of their comfort zones, we’re going to ruffle some feathers and you’re going to possibly upset some people, and you have to find some comfort in that, that if you’re not disrupting, if you’re not upsetting some people, you’re not really doing anything at all. 

Lindsay: 

Yup. My therapist said the other day to me I like to be liked. 

Tanya: 

Yeah, we all do. 

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Lindsay: 

So, I actually want to be liked, and I’m not your typical A where I want to like… I’m okay with confrontation. I actually abhor it. I don’t like it. I don’t want any of it. 

Tanya: 

As an A and a middle child, I’m exactly the same way

Lindsay: 

I just want it to be great, and I want people to like me and I want what I do to help people. My therapist said the other day, “You have to fight somebody. You have to. It’s a human need. You need to find somebody that you’re willing to pick a fight with or that you’re willing to go into a fight with because if you don’t, you’re just going to be internally fighting with yourself.” At one point you have to stick up for yourself and you say that this is the battle that I’m going to pick today. And it’s not about you being good or liked or not. It’s about you saying, this is wholam and I’m okay with it. And if everybody likes me, I’m not doing enough to push the envelope. I’m not doing anything actually going to help people in a major way, which is what… This is what you want. So, when you’re not 

doing that, you’re out. You’re in conflict with your values. 

Tanya: 

Oh, I love that you’re in conflict with your values. I think that’s so true. Like I said, you have to ruffle some feathers to really get people to want to change or to really make the movement that you’re really trying to do. And I think that builds into that idea of the comparisonism that you talked about here just a few minutes ago and also in the book, this comparison game that people play where it’s like, “Gosh, I’m afraid to stray out and do something different because nobody else is doing this so I don’t want to be different.” But different is good. Different is amazing, right? 

Lindsay: 

Yes. It has to be. You have to just be… You need to double down on the things that make you different. Those are the things that are going to make you stand out, and those are the things that allow the tribe that’s supposed to be following you to connect to you, right? The people that are not connecting to the things that make you different and weird, and make you kind of stand out, those are the people that are meant to 

connect to somebody else. Those are somebody else’s tribe. You don’t need to rob someone else’s tribe. You build your own by allowing the people that are supposed to be here to connect to who you are, and when is there time to leave, it’s their time to leave. You don’t have to mourn them. There’s somebody else that’s waiting in the wings to come in and connect to what you’ve got. 

Tanya: 

Oh, I love that. I think that’s so true. This is the thing. We’re so busy trying to be everything to everyone. We end up being nothing, right? 

Lindsay: 

Absolutely. 

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Tanya: 

We want to speak to a certain type of person or an individual. This is why I think it’s so important to know who you’re wanting to impact, who are you wanting to affect the change in because yes, it’s nice to get other people in and to help them as well, but when you try to help everyone and you try to spread yourself so thin, you’re not able to really make the impact you want. 

Lindsay: 

I love you. You just get it. 

Tanya: 

We do 

Lindsay: 

Yes, all of that. 

Tanya: 

We get each other. We do. We definitely do. Let me do a quick pause really quickly for my sponsor for today. And then I want to come back and let’s talk some more because I am loving this conversation. 

Lindsay: 

Awesome. 

Tanya; 

This episode has been sponsored by the University of California, Irvine or UCI. And as we’ve discussed in the past, for many people, lack knowledge can be a huge roadblock when it comes to pursuing their dreams. Maybe they don’t know about accounting or legal paperwork or marketing or whatever, so they let that get in the way of following their passion. If that sounds something you’ve ever said, then check out UCI because they have a division of continuing education that’s been around since 1962, and provides learning pathways for anyone who’s wanting to advance their careers or just want some personal enrichment. 

They have courses and certifications and a wide range of categories from business and education to digital marketing, human resources, project management, healthcare and tons of others. Their courses are 100% online and you can advance your career and as little as six months. Ideal for those of you who are juggling work, family, and maybe even wanting a career change. UCI is a great resource for anyone wanting to reenter the workforce after taking time off or maybe help gain those new skills to help you with that side business you’ve been talking about. 

Registration is now open for the fall quarter, and they have a great offer for Productivity Paradox listeners. Simply go to ce.uci.edu/productivityparadox and enter the promo code Paradox to get 15% off of one of their courses. Once again that’s ce.uci.edu/productivityparadox, and don’t forget to use the code Paradox to get 15% off. This offer is valid until December 31st, 2019. I’ll also have a link in my show notes. 

Tanya: 

So, Lindsay, I love how raw and honest you are about a subject that a lot of women and this is a lot of business women too like to avoid. There’s 

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some reason charging our worth is so difficult. We feel guilty doing it. And I know that you said that was your number one mistake with your first business not charging enough, right? 

Lindsay: 

Not making any money, yes. 

Tanya: 

Because it’s not enough to put forth good in the world. I like to tell people you need money for the mission. I got to pay my employees. I 

got to pay my employees. I need my kids to be able to eat. I need to pay my mortgage. I couldn’t offer things the free trainings or this podcast, if you don’t have an income. 

Lindsay

100%. 

Tanya: 

How do we get over this stumbling block and tell it ourselves, “Hey, it’s okay to charge what you’re worth?” 

Lindsay: 

Yeah. I think that it comes down to… Well, number one, you have to believe in this. You have to believe in what it is that you’re doing. If you go into this and you’re like, “Oh, I don’t know. I’m just putting one toe in the water and we’ll just see.” Of course, you’re never going to charge your worth because you’re treating your business like a hobby, you’re not treating it like a business. But in a business, you have to make money in order to keep it going and you cannot pay your bills on other people’s happiness with your free product, which we 

Tanya: 

Wouldn’t it be nice? 

Lindsay: 

It would be great. I would do it all the time if I could. 

Tanya: 

Oh my gosh. Me too. But yeah, my kids do like to eat three meals a day

Lindsay: 

They just constantly are asking for snacks and someone has to pay for them. 

Tanya: 

Somebody has to. Yeah. 

Lindsay

So that costs money and as soon as you get that in your brain, this is a business. It’s separate from who you are. And it’s separate from your relationship with the people that you know. Small businesses are built on the backs of the people that we know, the connections that we have. Eventually it gets bigger and bigger. But at the beginning when you’re just getting something off the ground, it’s your friends who are going to use you and as a friend, your friend should want to support you. 

And so, if you have to, it’s time to have those hard conversations with a friend. For me, I always try to pay for the things that my friends are good at. And then I set the precedent of, “Look, I want to support your 

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business. And in order for me to do that, I need to give you real dollars.” Thave a friend who is an esthetician and every time I go there, she waxes my kid’s eyebrows, judgment free zone. She waxes my kid’s eyebrows 

and she waxes my eyebrows, and she never wants to charge. But it’s my obligation as a friend and someone who wants to support her to pay her anyway, and to pay her more if I have to or if I can. 

Tanya: 

Yes. 

Lindsa

And sometimes it takes having that hard conversation where someone’s like, “Oh my friend, Lindsay’s a photographer. She’ll just do it for you.” And they volunteer you to do something, and so you might have a conversation where you have to sit down across from someone and say, “Look, I love you. This is my business. And in order for me to keep it going, I have to get paid for my time. This is how much I’m getting paid right now. Now, for you because I know you, I’m going to throw in a couple extra things,” right? 

Tanya: 

Right. Which is great. 

Lindsay: 

“This is the minimum that I must get paid in order to keep my business going, and I would support you. I would hope that you want to support that as well.” And having that conversation doesn’t mean that your friendship isn’t important, it means that it is important. It’s so important, you’re willing to have the hard conversation now rather than stopping the friendship down the road because you’re upset with them because they took advantage of you and they don’t even know it, right? 

Tanya: 

I think that’s the thing. They don’t even realize it, but if you want to stop having what you’re doing as a hobby, you have to stop treating it like a hobby. Doing it for free makes it a hobby. Even if you’re doing it for free, for friends and family, you’re treating it like a hobby. How can they not look at it as a hobby? 

Lindsay: 

Absolutely. And they are only going to take it as seriously as you take it. And so, if you’re telling them, “Hey, look. My goal for this business is to be a multimillionaire.” That happens 100, 200, $300 at a time. Your contribution to this matters. Here’s why I want to be a millionaire. Here’s what I’m going to do with that money. This is what it’s going to look in the end. This is what this money represents to me. And as a real friend, they‘re going to be onboard with helping you do that. And if not, then now you know, if they get upset about it in the end, now you know that they were actually just using you for what you could give them, and they don’t have any desire to help you get what you want out of your life. And that’s not a friend. 

Tanya: 

Yeah. We have to walk away from this guilt of feeling we shouldn’t be wanting to be millionaires or to make a lot of money because when… 

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Look at Oprah Winfrey. She’s a billionaire, and look at what she does, the impact she makes on people’s lives so much where you can do so much. 

Lindsay: 

I want it all. The more good money in the hands of good people can do amazing things, right? 

Tanya: 

Mm-hmm. 

Lindsay: 

And money is not bad. There’s a quote that I put into my book that I talk about my pastor says, “Hey look, when a good thing becomes an ultimate thing, ultimately that good thing can become a bad thing.” But if money is not the ultimate thing, if it’s something else, if it represents something, that’s the thing that you’re going for. It’s not the money. Money is not a bad thing. Money in the hands of good people can do amazing things. We can go change the world with money, but it first starts with you taking it seriously and realizing how important it is. 

Tanya: 

I think that’s so true. I tell my husband I want to make enough money, I can give it all away. We can go to these charity events and we can put in ridiculous bids or things that just because we want to give it away. 

Lindsay: 

Yup. Michael and I were working on doing this where we can live off the interest of the money that we have invested, and then the rest of it’s all gravy. We can do anything we want with it. We just walk up and give people thousands of dollars if we want. Or if we see a need, we can do that. We can fund someone’s adoption. We can do all the things that we’ve dreamed of doing because we’ve set ourselves up for that. But you can’t give from an empty well. 

Tanya: 

No, you really can’t. And I think that’s such a good thing for people to remember. You have to have that well. It has to be nice and healthy, and filled in order to give it away. 

Lindsay: 

Yeah 

Tanya: 

Absolutely 

Lindsay: 

Money is such a normal thing that I think that men easily talk about because it’s part of the business world. It’s what they do. And as the 

typical breadwinners, it’s not abnormal for men to talk about money. And for women, we get into this place where we’re like, “Oh, they’re going to judge me. Is this all about… ” It’s just not a normal topic of conversation. And we’re caregivers. So talking about ourselves and talking about what we want feels selfish, but it doesn’t have to be that if you make up your mind to change your mindset about it and realize money is just a tool to get what you want out of your life and for you to be able to live the life that you are put here on Earth to live. 

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Tanya: 

Absolutely. Amen to that I couldn’t agree more, honestly. 

Lindsay: 

Great. 

Tanya: 

I mean, this is the thing is we feel guilty about the money. We feel guilty about pursuing things that make us happy. We feel guilty for that. And I think you say something so poignant in your book, Boss Up! where you say, the fact that I can do it doesn’t mean I am doing it or that I should do that. I feel we often feel so pigeonholed into these things that we do because well, this is just what I do, or this is what I’ve always done or we’re asked all the time to do it because well you’re just good at it, so you should just do it, right? 

Lindsay: 

Yup. Yes, yes, yes, yes. All the things, yes. We should do the things that we want to do. And I think again, for women, we just feel if it’s if it’s 

good, it should be hard. If it’s good, we should hate it. Of course, motherhood is really hard and difficult, but we’re raising humans to grow up and continue our legacy, and all this kind of stuff. It is hard work and it is good work, and I’m not discounting that, but maybe it’s not your only work. And maybe we can do the hard thing of doing a really good job raising our kids and giving them a mother that’s fully fulfilled in her life alongside that. 

Tanya: 

Well, you’re role modeling for your children. When you’re pursuing the things that you’re passionate about, you’re teaching your children what life can look like. 

Lindsay

100%. 

Tanya: 

What life can be when we spend our days just feeling worn down because we’re a glorified taxi driver and we’re beaten down by that. 

That’s what you’re teaching your kids like this is what life can look like, instead of you reframe it as to l’m pursuing my passion and I’m a good mom because I’m pursuing my passion, because I’m pursuing my goals. 

That really helps you understand that you’re showing your children, you’re giving them that guidance so they can do it in their own lives. And isn’t that what we want for our children? 

Lindsay: 

Yeah. And listen I was just thinking about the other day, and I was talking to Mike and I was talking with my therapist and he says money skips a generation often because we’ll have self-made money, self-made millionaires and then they hand the money to their kids. Their kids feel they don’t deserve it, so they blow it. And then their kids subsequently have to build the wealth again. And what I want is my kids to realize like, “Hey, you can build a great amount of money doing what you love and deserve it at the same time.” I don’t want to fall into this trap where my kids, they don’t have this hard work ethic where they don’t feel like they can do everything. They don’t feel like they deserve what they’re getting 

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and therefore they fall into this money trap where they have nothing because they feel like they don’t deserve it. We have to teach our kids that you can deserve it if you work really hard for it. 

Tanya: 

Absolutely. I don’t know about you, but family is a big part of my business, so my kids are actively involved. I talk about my business to my kids. I tell them what’s going on. A lot of people feel that’s so separated that they’re a mother, and then there’s this whole other area of their world that their kids don’t get access to, and I’m like, oh no, no. My kids, 

they go up to the office, they make boxes. They might need stamping things. They’re processing things. I mean, get your kids involved. There’s no reason why you can’t show them a peek behind the curtain of what you do all day that you love. 

Lindsay: 

I am all for child labor. I am all for it. My kids love getting involved in what I do. They love seeing it. If you ask them probably two of the three would tell you today, “Oh, I’m going to work for my mom or I’m going to do what my mom does.” And I think that’s awesome. I mean, obviously they’ll change their mind by the time they become teenagers, but right now I love that they get to be involved and they get to see it, and they get to see me hustle my butt off for the thing that I want and work really hard for things that are really hard. It teaches them things that I could never teach them with my words and that school is not teaching them. 

Tanya: 

Yeah, absolutely. I feel the same way because I feel my kids are so invested in what we do, and we look at it as my mission for the business, that’s a family business. So, it’s our mission as a family to help other people. 

Lindsay: 

We even have money conversations with our kids. We sat them down this year and we just laid out all of our finances for them. Hey, this is how much we make. This is how much we give away. This is where it goes. 

They were shocked to hear all that stuff. But I feel like, okay, they are 10 and eight right now, but they’re still old enough to understand stuff costs money, and here’s where it comes from. I don’t want them to ever think that it just landed in their lap one day. Lucky them. That’s not their thing. There’s a whole bunch of hustle behind that dollar. So, I want them to realize that. 

Tanya 

There’s a lot of work that goes into it. 

Lindsay: 

Yeah. 

Tanya: 

Yeah. We do the same thing. My kids know how much money we make. My kids know how much money we give away. They know what we do, philanthropy wise. All of that is really important conversation so that they, understand it all. They understand the passion behind what we do, and why we do it. 

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Lindsay: 

Totally. 

Tanya: 

Definitely they know why mom is working so hard. 

Lindsay: 

Right. Exactly. Why does she have to travel? 

Tanya: 

You like me, we both work with our husbands, so it really is even more so a family business because I work, John is my CMO. We literally sit across the desk from each other. And I know Michael is a key part of your business as well, right? 

Lindsay: 

Yeah. He’s actually my manager. He manages everything about my business and me. If I need someone to tell me what I should be doing at all times. So, like he’s my alarm for me this morning. I did want one too, but he set an alarm for me this morning to make sure I didn’t miss this. 

It’s just little things that we do together, and I love that my kids can see me working cooperatively with him. And how to live a life and build a business at the same time together in a way that’s not unrealistic. I mean, obviously we fight, and we do that in front of them and we make up, and we do that in front of them. But not all the making up, you know what I mean. 

Tanya 

Not all of it, but yes. 

Lindsay: 

They get to see how this is actually going to work so that they don’t have unrealistic expectations when they leave college and they just think, “Well, I don’t need to do the grunt work.” No, you do. 

Tanya: 

You do. 

Lindsay: 

Everyone has, I got to sweep the floor still in my own office, right? 

Tanya: 

Yes, yes. We still sweep the floors. I’m the same. Yes. Well, Lindsay, I’ve absolutely loved having you on the show today. 

Lindsay: 

Thank you. 

Tanya: 

And so, I would love for you, because I know your book is coming out in next week, so if you could give my listeners a little bit of information about where they can get the book, I think you have some preorder bonuses. 

Lindsay: 

Yeah. Okay. So, you can get it pretty much where any books are sold, but there are a few exclusive versions. So, the target exclusive is just for moms. It’s got an extra chapter in it with some mom hacks for working moms, which I love. There’s a Barnes and Noble exclusive and that one has a hand annotated chapter in it and a cool custom cover. And then there’s also the audio version that’s custom and it’s got a little bit of 

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extra content in it plus you’ll hear me laughing kind of give you a little side notes about stuff. And then on Amazon you can grab it for 17 bucks. It’s on sale already, so it’s 10 bucks off. And I’m super excited for the launch of this thing. There’s 10 philosophies in it and it’s the 10 success philosophies I’ve seen entrepreneurs use to build a successful business based on the success they want, not on the success that other people want for them. 

Tanya: 

It’s a fabulous book. I’ve read it, I actually have endorsed it in the book. It really is. As you can tell from hearing Lindsay talk today, her personality really does shine through in the book and it is a great tool book. It’s the book that I wish that I had when I first started my business because it would have been really, really helpful. 

really do when ook an 

Lindsay: 

Thank you. 

Tanya: 

So, Lindsay 

Lindsay: 

I’m so excited. 

Tanya: 

Yes. Well, thank you so much for coming on the show

Lindsay

Thank you. I appreciate it. 

Tanya: 

I absolutely loved chatting with Lindsay, and I hope you really enjoyed it as well. I want to encourage you, if you are interested in perhaps pursuing a side business or growing your current business, pick up her book Boss Up! You can buy it anywhere books are sold. I’ll also have links to Lindsay’s social media so you can connect to those on our show notes. 

And speaking of books you want to purchase, I did want to let you in on a little bit of a secret. I am going to be sharing our preorder bonuses next week. So, for anyone who purchases my book ahead of time, you’re going to get some seriously nice bonuses. So, I would encourage you to sign up for my weekly newsletter where I will be sharing the details on that. First, simply go to Tanyadalton.com/email to sign up. All right. Next week we will continue discussing our theme of small changes for big impact by talking about taking passion to the next level. All right, we’ll until next time, have a beautiful and productive week. 

Thanks for listening to Productivity Paradox. Now, we’d love to have you join the conversation. To Join Tanya’s free group, simply go to Tanyadalton.com/group. 

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