159: Living a Fully Charged Life with Meaghan Murphy | Tanya Dalton
Meaghan B Murphy podcast interview on The Intentional Advantage
January 28, 2020   |   Episode #:

159: Living a Fully Charged Life with Meaghan Murphy

In This Episode:

Are you ready to embrace a life filled with more positivity? Then you’ll love today’s conversation with guest Meaghan B Murphy who believes that you should search for the yay every day. Meagan is a multi-platform media junkie with a 20-plus year magazine career at places like Teen People, Cosmopolitan, and Self. She is also the current executive editor for Good Housekeeping and is working on her debut novel, The Fully Charged Life, which will make its debut in 2021. We talked about how learning to be grateful and practice gratitude has changed her life for the better after tragically losing her father to cancer. She shares her practice for being more present and how learning to say “no” has helped her tremendously in her life and career.

Show Transcript:

The Big Idea

Chase what excites you.

Questions I Answer

  • How can I be more positive?
  • Is optimism a learned skill?
  • How can I make my days more fun?
  • How I can say no kindly?

Actions to Take

  • Find your yay and pay attention to the moments of joy that come up throughout your days. Set aside a few minutes every day to think about what you’re grateful for and what made you say “yay” today.

Key Topics in the Show

  • How Meaghan forced herself to look for the good in her every day

  • How learning to say “no” has impacted Meaghan life in a positive way

  • Chasing what excites you in life and trusting your gut

  • The 3 F’s Meaghan uses before making any decisions

  • Meaghan’s practice of ‘stay in your day’ and how this helps her be present

Resources and Links

  • The 3 F’s Meaghan uses before making any decision: Family, Fun and Freedom
Show Transcript

This is Productivity Paradox with Tanya Dalton, a podcast focused on using productivity not just to do more but to achieve what’s truly important to you, and this season is all about you, You 2.0. To learn more about yourself, take Tanya’s free quiz and discover your own productivity style at Tanyadalton.com. 

And now get ready. Here’s your host, Tanya Dalton. 

Tanya: 

Hello, hello, everyone. Welcome to Productivity Paradox. I’m your host, Tanya Dalton, and this is episode 159. Today, I have a special treat for you because I’m really excited about today‘s guest. Meaghan Murphy is one of the most fun and high energy people I think I’ve ever met. I absolutely love her, and I know you will too. I think that her story is truly one that is so motivational and so inspirational in how she’s really completely reframed her mindset and changed how she looks at life. / don’t want to give too much away with today’s episode because I think you’re really going to love it. Let me tell you a little bit about Meaghan. 

Known for her high energy, upbeat personality and yay lifestyle, Meaghan B. Murphy is a multi-platform media junkie with a 20 plus year magazine career at titles like Teen People, Cosmopolitan, and Self. In addition to her current role as executive editor and life hacker of Good Housekeeping Magazine, Meaghan regularly appears on shows like Live with Kelly and Ryan, Dr. Oz, and The Today Show. When this certified FitPro and mama of Irish triplets, Charlie, James and Brooks, isn’t at the gym for 5:00 AM workouts, she’s busy penning her debut novel, The Fully charged Life, coming out in 2021. All right. Let me introduce you to Meaghan. Meaghan, I am absolutely thrilled to have you on the show 

today. 

Meaghan: 

Yay. 

Tanya: 

Here’s the thing is honestly you are one of the most upbeat, one of the most positive people I think I’ve ever met. I feel like when I’m in the room 

with you, your enjoyment for life is truly contagious. I love it. Well, I know that you’re always working to really help people to take the time to pay attention to the moments of joy that come up throughout their day. 

Meaghan: 

I call them yay. Yep. The moments of yay

Tanya; 

Yes. Yes. I love too like on Instagram how you do like your yay list and what are the different yays in your week. Why do you think it is that practicing positivity in this way is so important? 

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Meaghan 

Well, so for me, I believe that gratitude is the secret sauce in life. But the whole idea of keeping a gratitude journal felt like homework to me. I think it’s very valuable and a wonderful tool, but it didn’t work for me. What did work for me was just actively saying what made me say yay today. It was born from something a little bit deeper. My father had been diagnosed with pancreatic cancer and died within a five-month span. At that moment I was like, oh my goodness, I have three small children. How do I forge ahead? I started something called #operationgoodgrief, which is really just an exercise to look for one positive thing every day to focus on. I was taking a picture of it and I was posting it on Instagram with the #operationgoodgrief. 

It really forced me to look for good because I didn’t really see much good at the moment. 

Tanya: 

Yeah, it’s hard. 

Meaghan 

It really kind of created this community of people like, well, what’s going on? What’s going on for you? Are you okay? You’re still grieving. Because what really kind of what happens when you lose somebody, it’s like the funeral’s over and people think you’re okay. For people to watch me kind of going through this for two years, I felt like I was getting hugged by this community of supporters, but also like really retraining myself to more wholeheartedly and actively find good because I’m a person who is inherently negative, and I think that’s sort of everybody’s… It’s easier to be negative. Our primal default is negativity, right? It’s a survival mechanism. 

Tanya: 

Yes. It’s true. 

Meaghan: 

My nickname as a kid was grumpy. I wore a grumpy necklace. 

Tanya: 

Oh my gosh, I would never in a million years guess that. Ever. Ever. 

Meaghan: 

It’s really funny. Isn’t that wild? That’s why I’m so passionate about the book project I’m working on because I realized that anybody can retrain their brain and anyone can live like this. I look at my youngest son who’s six who is a little rain cloud and I’m working very, very hard on 

Tanya: 

Tlove that. 

Meaghan: 

…I say reprogramming him and retraining him and he knows that. He’s like, “Okay, mom. We’re working on finding the yay because I’m a grump.” He knows it. His default is just, why would I want to play Simon Says? Why would that be any fun? I mean, like that’s who he is and that’s okay because giving him tips and tricks to tweak that and to rethink that. For two years, I actively did this whole thing called #operationgoodgrief. Through that process, I really, really, really sort of 

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changed how I operate in the world, and I began to just more authentically, organically, easily see what was good and become more present. As I moved through my grief, my dad will be gone four years 

January 15th, I really realized like, okay, I want to call it yay now

It sort of organically morphed into yay because I didn’t want to keep talking about the pain and the sadness. I just wanted to see the good that I was now seeing more of. That’s how the yay list was born. It’s something that brings me great joy every day. I think there’s a lot of joy in social media, a lot of happiness in social media. I get to document good things and share it, and I get so many direct messages and people share their yay. I have moms sending me pictures of their kid doing a video before school of sharing their yay list with their mom. That is such a gift that. That good energy could be contagious. I feel so grateful to be able to share that and to have been able to go on that journey a little bit publicly on social media to help other people. 

Tanya; 

Oh my gosh. Okay. First of all, as I said, I’m totally blown away by the fact that you say that you are naturally a negative person. I think what is so truly beautiful here is that you fully embraced who you are, like your weaknesses, your strength, just who you are as a whole and you’re like, okay, I want to make a change here. I want to shift how I’m filtering my life, right? Because when you are being positive, you’re filtering actively for positive things. If you’re focusing on being negative, your brain is filtering and pulling out all the negative. This is that whole idea of the law of attraction. It really is how your brain works and how it filters things. Just the fact that you were able to shift the way that you look at the world by doing something so simple, one thing a day, one thing. 

Meaghan: 

Isn’t that crazy

Tanya: 

It really is. I think so often we think it has to be these giant things that we’re doing. Like it takes this big effort to make a shift in our lives, and I feel like you are a perfect example of it’s a small thing. One small step really can move you in that right direction to change your mindset and change the way that you feel. It’s incredible. 

Meaghan: 

That’s the neat part. It takes patience because nothing is an overnight success, right? 

Tanya: 

True. 

Meaghan: 

I’ve been a magazine journalist and a service journalist for 25 years, and I think that I’ve picked up so many different tips and tricks and strategies over the years. I mean, I was an editor at Cosmo at one point many years ago, and I edited an article called The Seven Secrets of… I wrote it. I was actually the writer on that, but The Seven Secrets of Happiness. That piece was when I first started to realize we have control over our 

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emotions and control over our happiness. Choose happy’ isn’t just an Instagram bumper sticker. It’s actually something you can do. That’s neat, but it wasn’t like at 21 l write the story and I’m like, okay, now! 

choose happy. I’m done. 

It was years and years of self-reflection and trying on some of these tips and tricks and trying on some of these strategies and realizing what works for me. I’m in the process of writing this book called, The Fully Charged Life, which is sort of a… It’s a guide to having endless energy and finding the yang in everyday and everything in the book is this simple. Everything is tiny, tiny tweaks because I don’t think any of us are broken and I’m not going to fix anybody, but tomorrow could definitely be more awesome and there are simple little things you could do. 

Science backed. They’re going to help you find that awesome. 

Tanya: 

Oh, I love that. Yes, I think that’s the thing, it’s small huge movements. We talk about this in The Joy of Missing Out, simple to implement, easy to manage, yet monumental in the impact they can make. It doesn’t have to be big. Small is a great place to start. Little things. I love that and I think that for you, you have a lot going on. I’m really excited about your book that you’re working on, The Fully charged Life. You’re also the 

executive editor of Good Housekeeping. You recently launched a podcast, but here’s the thing, people can look at you and go, oh my gosh, you’re so busy, but you’re not. You really actively carve out the time and you’re very intentional with it I feel like. You’re so good about taking time for yourself. 

Meaghan; 

Well, this is 

Tanya: 

Go ahead. 

Meaghan: 

When people say, “Oh, you do it all,” and I say absolutely not. I can not 

do it all. I only do what matters. I’m an expert no sayer. I love to say no, so that way I have room to say yes to what matters. That was also hard earned. Even early in my career as a mom, I would say yes to everything. Oh my gosh, I got to say yes to that birthday party. I got to say yes to counting Box Tops for school. I have to say yes to this, this, this, and I had a really… Like I had an epiphany with all the yes saying. My daughter was in first grade and wanted to look like I was really actively involved in the school, and so I said, “Okay, yes, I’m going to count Box Tops.” Okay, they drop off 

Tanya: 

Yeah, I’ve done that. That’s a fun little project. 

Meaghan: 

It’s a terrible job, and they dropped off 932 Box Tops. My babysitter sort of put them in the mud room. I forgot about them, and then I get a call from the PTO president like, “So those Box Tops were doing yesterday at noon. What’s the final tally,” and I was like, oh no, I’m in New York 

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right now. I didn’t count a single Box Top. I didn’t, Oh my goodness.” Then I realized like, why did I say yes to that? Because I care what the PTO president thinks about me? Why in God’s name did I say yes to that? I don’t have any free time to count Box Tops. If I do have free time, I want to do something that’s what I call kid facing. 

I want to volunteer in the classroom to teach a lesson on magazine making and have everybody make a mini Good Housekeeping Kids, which / subsequently did in second grade. I learned my lessons, right? 

Tanya: 

Love it. 

Meaghan: 

Saying no to those things. Say no to the birthday party for the kid that your kid has no interest in. Who cares this way you’re free to say yes to what matters? As a 44-year-old mother of three, I’ve gotten really, really, really, really good at saying no. You can’t even believe the things that I say no to in a day. 

Tanya: 

Yeah, I know exactly what you mean. Because obviously I mean, my listeners are like, yep, I see why Tanya likes Meaghan so much,” because you are. You’re an expert no sayer. I feel like the yeses you say yes to are are not just like, yeah, I’ll do it. It’s like, yes. That’s what creates your zest for life I think is that you are actively choosing what really fulfills you, what fires you up, what puts fire in your belly. That makes such a huge difference. I just feel like you do a good job of saying no so you can do a good job saying yes. 

Meaghan: 

Exactly. I also think I chase excitement. One of the things that I laugh about in life is that I’ve never actually had a career goal and yet I’ve been moderately successful in my career. 

Tanya: 

You’ve done pretty well. 

Meaghan: 

Yeah. It’s because I chase what excites me because I realize in life when we’re excited about something, we’re going to be good at it. For me, I had won an essay contest when I was 18 and it kind of propelled my magazine career because I was on a national television show and a number of magazines had reached out to be able to tell my story. I said yes, but I want to be your intern. I’m at YM Magazine and the next thing! know I’m an intern, and the next thing I know I’m writing cover stories, and I have my own column. I said, “I want to be a contributing editor,” which happened by the time I was 19 because I was excited. I was a teenager working in a teen magazine, and then Time Inc. said, “Oh, we’re going to launch a teen magazine,” I’m raising my hand. 

I go over to Time Inc. to launch Teen People. I was also acting and doing MTV. Then the next thing I know I’m at Victoria’s Secret launching the Pink Line. Then I find myself at Cosmo as a young single person in the 

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city. I was just chasing whatever was of interest and exciting to me in those moments. I landed at Self Magazine during what I call ‘my self formative years’. It’s when I got engaged, married, had my three kids. It’s no accident that I wound up at Good Housekeeping the year I moved to the burbs and got a swing set, right? Because I do what feels right and feels exciting in a moment and I chase that excitement. Like I know that i need to be excited to be good. 

Tanya: 

Oh, it’s so true. I love what you just said there. I know I need to be excited to be good. I want to talk about this idea of how do you figure out what you’re going to say yes to in just a second. First, let’s give a quick pause for today’s sponsor. This week’s episode has been brought to you by my company, inkWELL Press. If you enjoy the systems and the strategies that I talk about here on the podcast, but sometimes maybe struggle to apply into your life, take a look at the planning inserts that I’ve designed because they align with everything we talk about here on the show. This will make it even easier to make 2020 your year to shine. Right now we are still at the start of a fresh year. 

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Okay, Meaghan, before the break, we touched on this idea of you’re saying yes to things that bring in that excitement and that’s really what has guided you through this, I mean, amazing life that you have where you’ve been working on these different magazines and MTV and Victoria’s Secret and all these incredible things. How is it that you really know what you want to say yes to? 

How are you able to discern what is a no and what is a yes? 

Meaghan: 

Well, I have a very specific filter. I look at three factors, fun, family, and freedom. Those are the things that matter to me. I think we all sort of have to understand what matters to us. For me, I want to put the fun in any situation. When I was the fitness director at Self Magazine, I used to say, “We put the fun in fitness.” I really started to realize, well, that’s one of my filters. Things need to be fun and they need to be family forward, family first. Is it good for my family? Is it fun? Is it going to provide freedom? I need creative freedom. I need spacial freedom. I need all the freedom to be me and to do me. Those are sort of my filters. If it’s not checking those boxes, it’s a no. 

Tanya: 

I love it. Yeah, it’s kind of like how we talk about using your North Star as your filter, your core values, your mission, your vision. That’s exactly 

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what you’re doing here, which you’ve really simplified it with these three 

F’s. I think the thing is is for everyone, obviously, it’s different. 

Meaghan: 

Oh, totally. That’s what I care about. 

Tanya: 

Yes. That’s what our listeners have to do. What is it you truly care about? Listen, if you get so excited about counting Box Tops, then go for it. 

Meaghan: 

Oh, exactly. 

Tanya: 

Do it. 

Meaghan: 

Yes. That could be very satisfying. 

Tanya: 

Yeah. If you’re a spreadsheet person or you like numbers, great. Good for you. Not good for Meaghan. That’s not what Meaghan wants. 

Meaghan: 

Exactly. We all have to put things through our own filter and decide what those filters are. Those filters can also change, right? I mean, I think that’s also important to know. Nothing is static. I mean, I really think that life is so fluid and who you are today might not be who you are tomorrow, sol do must. 

Tanya: 

Yeah. I mean, when you were 19, family probably wasn’t one of your filters. 

Meaghan: 

No. 

Tanya: 

It was something else. 

Meaghan: 

Fun probably was still up there, but… 

Tanya: 

Fun was probably still up there. Definitely. But yeah, I think that’s spot on with a lot of the things that we talk about. But I feel like you are such a great embodiment of really living that and even just the way that you call your family Team Murphy, very similar to how i call my family, Team Dalton, and you build up that team mentality partially because you’re using that as a filter. Would you agree with that? 

Meaghan: 

Oh, sure. I mean, in the love charge of my book, I think that one thing talk about is that everybody should treat their family like a team. I think that’s a huge part of the success of Team Murphy is that we really do function like a team and think of each other as a team. My husband is my Co-captain, and we’re all working together for a common win. My family is everything. It’s family is everything, family over everything. That’s all that matters to me is Team Murphy. 

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Tanya: 

Which is why it is such a great filter for you, for your yeses. 

Meaghan: 

My number one filter. 

Tanya: 

I know that you involve your kids in your work life. I do the same thing. Again, I think our listeners are like, “Yep, I know why they’re friends with each other,” because I think it’s so important. I know for you, you bring your kids into the office, sometimes you include them in interviews. Is that difficult for you or has that been difficult? Your kids are younger than mine are now because mine are six foot two. 

Meaghan: 

My goodness. You have people. 

Tanya; 

I know. It happens so fast, right? This is why we want to find that joy in every day because it does go so quickly. We feel like the days are long, but the years are short and I think it’s so true. 

Meaghan: 

I would say because my jobs never feel like work because it’s what I care about when I care about it. It’s been super natural for me to involve my kids in certain ways. I’m here at Good Housekeeping. Good Housekeeping speaks to everything I care about. I mean, we talk about home, family, crafting, food. You name it. We talk about it. We cover it. My kids are toy testers for Good Housekeeping. I mean, that’s epic. The 

fact that they get to come in here to these little labs and test toys. I mean, one of the first things my kids will tell you when they meet you is 

that, “I’m a Good Housekeeping toy tester. I’m a professional toy tester.” I mean, that’s pretty fun. 

They’ve done TV segments with me because a lot of what my TV appearances wind up being is projects that we’re doing at home that a producer sees on my Instagram. It’s like, “Hey, can we do that on camera,” or I’m doing hacks or life hacks or family hacks or home hacks from my house. I mean, I film often in my house for a lot of the different shows that I work with. They’re just such a natural part of what I do and the stories that I tell and the information that I get to share that I never think twice about including them. They love being a part of it. 

Tanya: 

I think that’s the thing that people don’t understand is that your kids want to be a part of your world. 

Meaghan: 

Goodness. Yes. 

Tanya: 

We so often think that work happens at work and you come home and you ask your kids about their day, but you don’t necessarily talk about your own. I think it’s so important, and you do this, I do this too, where it’s like let’s talk to our kids about what mom is doing at work and what dad is doing at work because then they really understand. Not only do they understand, but they value it. They understand when things are a 

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little bit crazy or hectic, and they want to pitch in. They want to be a part of your world just as much as you want to be a part of theirs. 

Meaghan: 

Exactly. I would say this, sol joke that I work at candy land and Good Housekeeping is a really fun place to visit. But even if you work at a doctor’s office, a bank, you name it, you need to bring your kid in for show and tell. I think it’s so important for kids to have a visual of where mommy or daddy goes every day that’s so important that it takes them away from you, right? I want my kids to know some of my co-workers, to know what my office looks like, to see their picture on my desk, to see their drawings hanging on my wall and to know, regardless of where! work, that they’re there with me in mind, body, spirit, right? I think that’s important. 

Tanya: 

Yeah, I totally agree and even if you’re doing a job I think that maybe you don’t think it’s as exciting. I mean, this is a story that someone’s going to tell themselves. As they’re listening to this episode, they‘re going to be like, “Well, yeah, but Meaghan’s got this amazing, fabulous job.” We all have amazing, fabulous parts to our job. 

Meaghan: 

Exactly. Hey, listen why my husband works at a bank. I mean, he doesn’t have Oscar the Grouch come in for a desk side visit, but we still 

Tanya 

No toy testing. 

Meaghan: 

No toy testing. No food samples being cooked up by the test kitchen. I mean, none of that. I mean, we literally call this place candy land, but we made an effort to take my kids to my husband’s banker office. Boring as hell. Love you honey, but boring as hell. Just so they could… They sat in 

daddy’s chair and they took a spin. They typed on his laptop keyboard a little bit and just got a sense of like, hey, these are the people daddy works with. This is where daddy drives an hour every day. This is how long the drive is. This is where daddy’s going. This is what’s also important. This is how we help pay the bills. I mean, I don’t think you have to have a sexy job to do that. I think kids need to know where you 

are and what takes you away from them so that they realize that’s important too. 

Tanya: 

I think it really is the magic is what you make of it, right? It’s the whole idea that you can look at your job and go, “This is really boring. My kids aren’t to be interested,” but they are very happy to see where is this magical place that you’re going to every day. 

Meaghan: 

Yeah. 100%. 

Tanya: 

What are you doing that’s so outside of my laurels? 

Meaghan: 

100%. 

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Tanya: 

It’s this idea that you touched on earlier about finding the yay in your every day, right? The little moments, the finding the joy. There’s joy in your job. There is magic in where you work. Whether that’s working at a bank counting money or working at Good Housekeeping Magazine or owning your business like I do, there’s magical things there that you want to bring your family into. I think that that makes such a big difference. Focus on the positives. We all have positive things. We might have jobs that we’re like, oh, I’m not really in love with it. That’s okay. There are surely some kind of yay in your day, right? Find those joyful moments, 

Meaghan: 

100%. Even if you have like a young child and say, “Okay. I need you to make a picture for my wall, or I need you to find me something special that will remind me of you while I’m at work,” and then have like a field trip for them to bring that off to your office. I think that’s important. I’ve seen it in my chest that it’s… They come to my office and they see something hanging on the wall that they made and they’re like, “Ah,” They swell with pride. I mean, it’s a beautiful thing. 

Tanya: 

They do. You do such a good job of staying energized throughout the day and then you go home and I feel like you are really fully present with your kids. How do you really carve out that time to really feel present? We’re talking here in terms of kids, but it could be with your friends or the people who matter most to you outside of kids. How do you carve out that time to be really intentional and present because I think that’s when we really do find that joy because we’re deepening those relationships, right? 

Meaghan: 

Well, I have a saying with my kids and it’s called ‘stay in your day. We say it all the time. Stay in your day. Stay in your day. Don’t ask me about Saturday. Don’t ask me about Sunday. What’s happening right now? 1 went to Mason Gross School of the Arts as an actress, and I think one of the biggest gifts of my acting training was the ability to be highly, highly present. We used to do these exercises called repetitions where you would just basically stand face-to-face with another actor and you would just be repeating the same word back and forth to each other, but really internalizing the person’s tone and inflection and body language to be able to like truthfully mirror each other in a moment. 

You really have to listen and be present to do that effectively, and I think that I’ve been able to do that in life to really stay grounded. When I’m at work, I’m not thinking about my kids. I’m not a crummy mom, and I don’t not love them, but when I’m at work, I’m at work. When I’m at home, 

dear Good Housekeeping, I’m not thinking about you. I may see you on my coffee table, but I’m not thinking about you. I’m home with my kids. 1 have really made it a practice of staying in my day and being where I am. 

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Tanya: 

Tlove that, being where I am. I love that term, ‘stay in your day, I think I’m going to have to steal that from you because I just think that’s so true. We’re often wishing away the day for the weekend or the next vacation or something down the road, someday syndrome, that we deal with. 

Meaghan: 

I dealt with that. My kids will joke with me all the time. They’ll be like, “Uh, mom, can have a play date on Wednesday?” I’ll give him a look and 

they’ll go, “Okay, stay on my day. I get it, mom. I get it,” which also… The flip side of this is I’m a really terrible planner because I’m so in the moment that I’m like, ugh, who cares what will happen next week? I just want to be where I am. Thankfully I have a balanced partner and my husband is a little bit better at the forward thinking than lam because I’m just so present. 

Tanya: 

It takes all types. We got to work together, right? We’re the yin and the yang. That’s what makes the relationship work. 

Meaghan: 

Exactly. 

Tanya: 

I love it. I love it. I really, really enjoyed this conversation because I feel like for so many of my listeners who are telling themselves a story about who they are or what they do or what their job is or how they have control over their time, I feel like what you’ve said here today totally turns that on its head. 

Meaghan: 

Thope so. 

Tanya; 

It really is about changing their mindset. It really is finding the joy in their every day and that’s how you find optimism, that’s how you find positivity and happiness because you really do embody that. I love it. 

Meaghan: 

Thank you. That’s the best compliment ever frankly. I mean, when my father was dying, we sort of said like he got to tell us what he wanted his legacy to be. I got to say that I wanted mine to be one of positive energy. I get a little choked up when I say it, but that’s why I’m here. 

Tanya 

Yeah. I love that. I love that. I’m beyond excited for your book, The Fully Charged Life, to come out. It comes out in 2021. Do we have a date yet for that? 

Meaghan: 

It’ll be spring, Mother’s Day-ish, 2021. It’ll be after the election. The whole manuscript 

Tanya: 

We need that positivity. 

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Meaghan: 

Yes. But I’m thrilled that Penguin Random House believes in me and I’m thrilled to be working with them. Oh my goodness, I cannot wait to share this book because I’m bursting with it. 

Tanya: 

Yeah. Oh, I know that feeling. 

Meaghan: 

Right? 

Tanya: 

I know that feeling where you just cannot wait, and you feel like your heart’s just on fire with the message. You embody your message, and I think that is so strong. My listeners don’t have to worry about when the book comes out because you guys will hear about it because I’ll be talking about it. I will be supporting it and talking about it nonstop because I truly believe in Meaghan’s message and she does. She lives what she talks about, and I think that is so incredibly powerful. It’s something that you don’t often see to be honest with you. A lot of times you pull back the curtain on some of these experts and you’re like, you’re not live in the way you’re talking, and Meaghan’s, you do. I’ll be really proud to help support this book in whatever way I can for sure. 

Meaghan: 

All the hugs. 

Tanya 

Of course. Of course. Now, we‘re going to sign off, but I want to ask you one quick question. 

Meaghan: 

Sure. 

Tanya: 

If you could leave our listeners with one piece of advice, what would that be? 

Meaghan: 

Say no. Say no to something you don’t care about today please. Just say no. The old drug slogan, just say no. 

Tanya: 

I love it. I love it. 

Meaghan: 

Please. N-O. It’s a complete paragraph. 

Tanya: 

Mm-hmm (affirmative). It is. It really is. No is a complete sentence. We can just walk away with that no. Definitely. 

Meaghan: 

It’s more than a sentence. It’s a paragraph. 

Tanya: 

I love it. Well, Meaghan, thanks so much for being on the show with me today. I am so excited for my listeners to hear your message. I really cannot wait. 

Meaghan: 

Thank you. I’m so grateful to be here. 

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Tanya: 

Didn’t you just love Meaghan? I love her story and how she is a negative person by nature or how she’s not really truly an optimist and yet she has completely 100% reframed how she lives her life. She truly is one of the most optimistic, energetic people I think I’ve ever met. I absolutely love her, and I’ll make sure to have the links to all of her places where you can find her in the show notes. Just go to Tanyadalton.com/podcast and go to episode 159 to find all of those links. Again, you’ll know when Meaghan’s book comes out because I will be sure to let you guys know. I’m really excited for that book to come out. Now, we are going to be continuing our season on You 2.0 next week when we talk about discovering your superpowers. It’s a great episode. I can’t wait for you to listen. 

Do remember before you listen to that episode to head over to inkwellpress.com. Take advantage of this discount. I truly never discount my products this low. I really wanted to do it because of this season of 

You 2.0. Go to inkwellpress.com and then use that discount code “January50” to take advantage. All right. Until next time, have a beautiful and productive week. 

Thanks for listening to Productivity Paradox. Want to learn more about your own productivity style? Simply go to Tanyadalton.com to take her free quiz and get free 

resources designed just for you. 

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